BHVG MEDIA COVERAGE OVER THE YEARS

ACOUSTIC GUITAR MAGAZINE 

MAY 2018

TOM RUSH PLAYS SUICIDE SIX!

 By David Corriveau (Valley News Staff WriterThursday, July 06, 2017)

 During the countdown to his concert on Saturday night at Suicide Six in Pomfret, folk singer Tom Rush is waxing nostalgic about his  former life in the Upper Valley.

“I miss Dan & Whit’s,” the 76-year-old Rush, who now lives near Boston, said during a recent stop in West Lebanon to promote the show. “I miss the good people who were our friends and neighbors. I miss the guitar center in Hanover, and Bear Hollow Vintage Guitars.”

Rush moved away in 2014 — less from an urge for going than from the sale of the rental house in Norwich where he’d lived, quite contentedly, with his wife and their daughter.

This past May, Sharon resident and legendary Americana producer Jim Rooney offered him a dose of relief from the homesickness — as well as “a magic carpet ride” of supporting musicians — when they convened in Nashville to record the new album that Rush expects to release in the fall.

“It’s almost all my own songs for the first time ever — 10 out of the 12,” said Rush, who made his reputation interpreting, recording and bringing attention to the compositions of the likes of Joni Mitchell, James Taylor, Jackson Browne and Shawn Colvin. “I just got on a roll with the writing and the songs kept coming. And with Jim’s connections, we were able to get Kathy Mattea doing background vocals and Sam Bush on the mandolin. And the studio guys he can call in are just phenomenal. ... This album took six days to record. I remember albums that took six weeks.”

BIG THANK YOU TO ANDY BERRY FOR HIS KIND WORDS IN "BIG LOVE FOR SMALL SHOPS"- A GREAT FRIEND AND CLIENT!

By Adam Sullivan | 
Posted: Tue 6:34 PM, May 08, 2018  | 
Updated: Tue 7:07 PM, May 08, 2018
         
LEBANON, N.H. (WCAX) Most of the instruments at Bear Hollow Vintage Guitars are made, in part, of rosewood. The fingerboards are the most common piece. But that could soon change.

Rosewood has presented itself as a big issue in the guitar industry," said Sally Laurent of Bear Hollow Vintage Guitars.

Strict new regulations on the wood have been adopted after an international crackdown on illegal logging, which has dramatically impacted rosewood forests in Asia and Africa.

"The requirement of the industry was that they all had to prove and document where their rosewood came from," Laurent said.

Music industry experts say the new regulations have hit instrument manufacturers hard.

"We have one company that actually couldn't proceed because, financially, they couldn't bring in product and they had nothing else to sell and it was kind of a domino effect," Laurent said.

"It is actually a kind of a difficult wood to work; it is very splintery. We use it in mostly very thin pieces so it is very brittle and it tends to crack easily," said George Morris of Vermont Instruments.


But the Fairlee guitar-maker says rosewood also provides amazing tone, which is why it's so popular.

"I buy from certified dealers and they can provide paperwork if needed," Morris said.

However, Morris says he doesn't use it that much these days, in part, to avoid the paperwork. He also says when it comes to rosewood, guitar-makers aren't the problem.

"We are so frugal in what we use anyway," he said.

Furniture and veneer companies are by far the most common users of the wood.

Back at Bear Hollow, Laurent says environmental consciousness is very important.

"If you think of the wastefulness, it's like the people who harvest tusks and leave the animals to die in the woods," Laurent said.

And while she agrees regulation is needed, she fears the music industry is unfairly feeling its effects.

"Finding a balance between extreme regulation and helping smaller companies work with those parameters is really important," Laurent said.

A statement she hopes will strike a chord with those making the rules.